Soranni (sorafenib)

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  • Brand Name:
    Soranni
  • Origin:
    Laos
  • Small Orders:
    50 Bottles
  • Tags:
    HBV
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Poster
  • Details
  • Description
  • Packaging Size
    56T*200mg/bottle
  • Strength
    56T
  • Compositon
    sorafenib
  • Treatment
    HBV
  • Form
    Tablets
  • Brand
    Soranni
  • Quantity Unit
    200mg/T, 56T/Bottle
  • Manufacturer
    Tongmeng (Lao) Pharmaceutical & Food Co., Ltd.

Sorafenib brand name Soranni,Nexavar, is a kinase inhibitor drug approved for the treatment of primary kidney cancer (advanced renal cell carcinoma), advanced primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma), FLT3-ITD positive AML and radioactive iodine resistant advanced thyroid carcinoma.

Medical uses
Sorafenib is indicated as a treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), unresectable hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) and thyroid cancer.
Kidney cancer
Clinical trial results, published January 2007, showed that, compared with placebo, treatment with sorafenib prolongs progression-free survival in patients with advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma in whom previous therapy has failed. The median progression-free survival was 5.5 months in the sorafenib group and 2.8 months in the placebo group (hazard ratio for disease progression in the sorafenib group, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.55; P<0.01).

In Australia this is one of two TGA-labelled indications for sorafenib, although it is not listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme for this indication.

Liver cancer
At ASCO 2007, results from the SHARP trial were presented, which showed efficacy of sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma. The primary endpoint was median overall survival, which showed a 44% improvement in patients who received sorafenib compared to placebo (hazard ratio 0.69; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.87; p=0.0001). Both median survival and time to progression showed 3-month improvements; however, there was no significant difference in median time to symptomatic progression (p=0.77). There was no difference in quality of life measures, possibly attributable to toxicity of sorafenib or symptoms related to underlying progression of liver disease. Of note, this trial only included patients with Child-Pugh Class A (i.e. mildest) cirrhosis. Because of this trial sorafenib obtained FDA approval for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in November 2007.

In a randomized, double-blind, phase II trial combining sorafenib with doxorubicin, the median time to progression was not significantly delayed compared with doxorubicin alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Median durations of overall survival and progression-free survival were significantly longer in patients receiving sorafenib plus doxorubicin than in those receiving doxorubicin alone.

A prospective single-centre phase II study which included the patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) concluding that the combination of sorafenib and DEB-TACE in patients with unresectable HCC is well tolerated and safe, with most toxicities related to sorafenib.

In Australia this is the only indication for which sorafenib is listed on the PBS and hence the only government-subsidised indication for sorafenib. Along with renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the TGA-labelled indications for sorafenib.

Thyroid cancer
On 22 November 2013, sorafenib was approved by the FDA for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) refractory to radioactive iodine treatment.

The Phase 3 DECISION trial showed significant improvement in progression-free survival but not in overall survival. However, as is known, the side effects were very frequent, specially hand and foot skin reaction.

Desmoid tumors
A phase 3 clinical trial is under way testing the effectiveness of sorafenib to treat desmoid tumors (also known as aggressive fibromatosis), after positive results in the first two trial stages. Dosage is typically half of that applied for malignant cancers (400 mg vs 800 mg). NCI are sponsoring this trial.

Why is this medication prescribed?
Sorafenib is used to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC; a type of cancer that begins in the kidneys). Sorafenib is also used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (a type of liver cancer) that cannot be treated with surgery and a certain type of thyroid cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and cannot be treated with radioactive iodine. Sorafenib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of an abnormal protein that signals cancer cells to multiply. This helps stop the spread of cancer cells.

How should this medicine be used?
Sorafenib comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken twice a day. Sorafenib is taken without food, 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal. Take sorafenib at around the same times every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take sorafenib exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Swallow the tablets whole with water. Do not split, chew, or crush them.

Your doctor may decrease your dose of sorafenib during your treatment, or may tell you to temporarily or permanently stop taking sorafenib for a period of time if you experience side effects. Be sure to tell your doctor how you are feeling during your treatment with sorafenib.

Continue to take sorafenib even if you feel well. Do not stop taking sorafenib without talking to your doctor.

Sorafenib is not available in pharmacies. You can only get sorafenib through the mail from a specialty pharmacy. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about receiving your medication.

Ask your pharmacist or doctor for a copy of the manufacturer's information for the patient.

Other uses for this medicine
This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.


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